An Interview with Tori Bovalino

    A portrait of Tori Bovalino

    Tori Bovalino grew up in the United States and studied English and anthropology at the University of Pittsburg. She is currently in London where she studies creative writing at Royal Holloway. Her debut novel, THE DEVIL MAKES THREE, is published by Page Street Kids.

    I spoke to Tori online on 20 March 2021.


    INTERVIEWER

    I thought we could start a bit geographically because you were born in Pittsburgh, and now you’re in the UK in London.


    BOVALINO

    So, I’m a little bit outside of London. I actually moved out of the city proper, but yeah, I’m still in like the lower south of the UK.


    INTERVIEWER

    You moved out during the lockdown or, or before?


    BOVALINO

    So, it’s kind of a funny story. I say that, but it’s probably not funny at all.


    INTERVIEWER

    You’ve acquired the British sense of humor where dark things are actually funny.


    BOVALINO

    Exactly. It’s pretty straightforward. No, my partner and I were like, okay, it’s three weeks. Locked down. And then I hadn’t moved out six months later. So we thought, I guess this is going to be the thing now. So I might as well let my lease end. But yeah, I was living in East London for about two years and then phased up here.


    INTERVIEWER

    When did you first decide that writing was what you wanted to do and what have been some of the highs and lows of getting this first book published?


    BOVALINO

    So, I was one of those kids that always knew this was what I was going to do. I mean, if we go back to my preschool, –What do you want to be when you grow up? It definitely said author, but spelled incorrectly or something. So I did always know that this was something I wanted to do. I think it was a struggle to admit to myself that this was something that was an acceptable career path. I think a lot of authors will say this, that we are our own worst enemies. And so when I started undergrad, I actually wasn’t an English major at all. I was at a university, double majoring in anthropology and archaeology, just like double majoring in anthropology and anthropology. And then when I transferred universities, I thought, okay, well this writing thing, isn’t going away. I’ve tried to quit three or four times and that hasn’t stuck. So I might as well lean into it. So I went and I realized that I liked analyzing books as much as I liked writing them. And yeah, I went forth and did a master’s in creative writing. And I’m actually doing a PhD right now in critical and creative writing. So I’m looking at essentially young adult fantasy novels based on Slavic folklore, and how that sort of works out. What’s been translated. What’s going on there? It’s really boring.


    INTERVIEWER

    No, it doesn’t sound boring. I have a question right here about folklore, but we’ll get to that in a second. It’s good that you mentioned folklore as it’s fascinating. And if you double-majored in anthropology and anthropology, you probably spent a lot of time in the library. How has time spent in libraries when you were growing up and also now as an academic shaped THE DEVIL MAKES THREE?


    BOVALINO

    Immensely. So growing up, I am from a really small town in Pennsylvania and like our library though. It is good. We have the County libraries and everything. They’re quite small. And the city library though, going into the city of Pittsburgh and seeing the Carnegie library, I think it was one of the first like libraries that Andrew Carnegie funded. So it’s just beautiful. So seeing that was always really impressive to me. And then when I was going to school in different cities, university in different cities, seeing massive libraries and seeing that they can be these beautiful spaces that are also full of knowledge. And it’s okay to have this beauty that’s dedicated to knowledge. I really liked walking through Boston public library and seeing that it’s an art piece while also being a functional space. But the main influence really was when I was a junior in college. I started working at one of the university’s libraries and if you’ve been to Pitt, University of Pittsburgh, and gone into the Frick Fine Arts Library, you can definitely see that this is pretty much ripped out of the library and put into the book. So, I was working there and it is a closed stack system. And that just means that the library workers have to go back into the stacks. Patrons don’t go back there. We have to put everything away, get everything out and go up and down the floors. It’s very isolated – no windows, just tall stacks books. And very easy to get creeped out when you’re back there.


    INTERVIEWER

    While you were being creeped out, were you thinking that this could be a novel?


    BOVALINO

    All the time. So one of the main times I was working there was over the summer and we were basically just there so that if anyone was doing summer projects, we could come in and get stuff for them. If professors were planning their courses and also, just special projects in the library, like archival projects. And being there in the summer when literally no one’s on campus. And you’re just in these shelves, which are a lot colder than the rest of the building. And that flickering fluorescent lighting. And there’s only windows on the top floor and it feels sometimes like you’re completely isolated from the rest of the world.


    INTERVIEWER

    It sounds very spooky. This is probably a good time for you to give people a brief introduction to THE DEVIL MAKES THREE. Your elevator pitch.


    BOVALINO

    I just want to preface and say, I feel like I should be much better at elevator pitches by this point.


    INTERVIEWER

    I shouldn’t really ask the question, but on the other hand, I know it’s normally interesting to hear you talk about it. So, sorry.


    BOVALINO

    Realistically. I should know what my book is about. Hopefully. So THE DEVIL MAKES THREE is about two teenagers, Tess and Eliot, who are searching for grimoires in their school library. They accidentally find a very old book and they read it and unleash a demon from within it. And then they have to do everything in their power to put the demon back before he can kill everyone that they love, essentially.


    INTERVIEWER

    And they also come to know each other a lot better as well. Did that central relationship come before the general idea of ’devil in a book, put it back’, or was it the other way around?


    BOVALINO

    It was actually the devil in the book that came first. And that is specifically because part of my undergrad was a lot of folklore because I was doing combined anthropology and English. I sort of wanted to see where they intersect. So I took a lot of folklore classes and I was also a German minor. Tying that in. But it’s based off of old Faust legends. Like we think of Faust as you make a deal with the devil and you get X amount of time, et cetera, et cetera. But there’s also a second part of the legend, the mythology that’s Doctor Faust’s book, and that is essentially that the devil has a book and if you read it out loud, the devil comes to you and then you have to do a certain task – that I won’t say, because it will spoil the book – to put the devil back in the book.


    INTERVIEWER

    You have this hybrid of literary influences, horror influences, and fantasy influences. How did all that form together in your mind?


    BOVALINO

    So that was actually a mechanism of writing the book itself in that I had written about four or five drafts of the book and it just wasn’t working. And it didn’t have any magic in it. It was straight up mainly the horror elementss with just trying to play with the devil’s book. And it just wasn’t working. And so I broadened the scope a little bit into looking at British folk magic, and that is where the magical elements came in, in that it just didn’t function without some other system behind it to hold it in place. When I was writing it, at least. I’m sure somebody else could make it work.


    INTERVIEWER

    That’s an impossible hypothetical.


    BOVALINO

    Exactly. But the magical character, and it’s not a spoiler because it’s in the first or second chapter, the magical character, Eliot, was not magical until very late on in the process. I think. But two drafts before we sent a note submission. I think that’s when he sort of became somebody who can do magic, who has a history of magic and is familiar with it. And originally he was just evaluating these grimoires from a literary perspective, he was really just curious about it. Then it became different when he was practicing it.


    INTERVIEWER

    You mentioned going through drafts. Wwhen you’re drafting, who is looking at the manuscript?


    BOVALINO

    I feel like my drafting process is quite like a cat in a way. So, you know how a cat is like, –Pet me, –Don’t pet me, –Pet me, –Don’t pet me. I’m like read this, but actually don’t read this, but actually read this and then maybe don’t, so yeah. Finicky. But, I’ll do one or two drafts just by myself. And I’ll let people see a couple of pages, maybe. I have a critique group through my MA that I let see some stuff, sometimes. But usually I start with a fast draft that I write in like less than a month, that’s probably 30,000 words and then I expand it through subsequent drafts. The first draft is never going to be really anything like the final, because I’m trying to figure it out. So I usually don’t let anyone see it until probably the third, second or third draft. And then I send it to a couple of critique partners that I’ve met through the years, who’ve read many things. And I trust them with my work. And then once it gets through them and I have time, I sit with their notes, revise, pick, and choose what I want to incorporate. Then I send it to my agents and they are quite editorial. I was laughing about this with another client. They might just be really editorial with me, but who knows? And so we’ll go through a couple of revisions and then eventually it will either at this point, it’ll either go to my editor, or on submission, or wherever it’s supposed to go.


    INTERVIEWER

    And when did the title change? When did it go from being INKED to being THE DEVIL MAKES THREE?


    BOVALINO

    So that happened last summer, after the book was acquired, probably. In line with the last round of developmental edits, before we went on to line edits and everything like that, which is a lot more specific. It was one of those things, –Marketing thinks we might do with the title change. –How do you feel about it? And I don’t really like to get married to any titles or details so I was totally fine. And THE DEVIL MAKES THREE, the title, is actually from, I’m probably going to say this wrong, I can never remember if it started as a folk song or if it was written specifically for a movie, but it is like a folky songs from the American South.


    INTERVIEWER

    I was trying to figure out where it was from. And there is that 1952 film which I’ve never seen it.


    BOVALINO

    We sang it in college and that’s how I knew it. It was just that phrase that stuck in my head from a song.


    INTERVIEWER

    And THE DEVIL MAKES THREE is the third book you’ve sent out. You had another one which sounded intriguing, the gender-swapped THE LITTLE MERMAID. Is that still in the metaphorical chest?


    BOVALINO

    I think anything in the metaphorical chest can come out at any time. It’s funny because I just did an interview at the end of December, where I said it’s in the chest, I’m not looking at it. And literally a couple of days later I pulled it out and did another revision.


    INTERVIEWER

    The problem with this sort of metaphorical chest is it’s really just a folder and it’s really easy to open.


    BOVALINO

    It’s like a state and I’ll just go and be like, –O, it’s mermaid time. Okay.


    INTERVIEWER

    You need to lock it somehow. You need to put it in a vault.


    BOVALINO

    I do, because I have other things I need to do. But that is, a gender swap A LITTLE MERMAID set in South Carolina and I love that book. My family loves that book. It will maybe eventually come out of the chest for real. I do pull it out every few months and do a revision of it. And then the first project I’ve ever queried, um, I honestly can’t even pitch it cause to this day I can’t narrow it down to what it’s about, which is probably why it’s so flawed. And I think I’m going to age it up to adult, but I don’t know. But again, anything found to come out at any time.


    INTERVIEWER

    I want to step back a moment. You said you’re studying young adult fantasy. And you mentioned ageing the book up. What does that mean?


    BOVALINO

    Funny you ask. I just taught a class on this. So I can pull up my Powerpoint. Young adult is actually more of, it’s a contested thing. Is it a genre? Is it a category? What is it? It really at its basis is a marketing category. And if you break it down to its bones, it’s a marketing category that says that the protagonist is going to be between 13 and 18. Most of the characters will be between 13 and 18. And there’s generally going to be some journey that has this like rough, emotional arc that follows a lot of the main characters emotions specifically. A close focus on a few characters rather than this broad scope. And so when they’re talking about young adult versus middle grade, I think middle grade is finding your place within a family and young adult is finding your place within the wider world.

    What classifies young adult against adult a lot of times is this idea of voice, and that’s so hard to pin down. This is why everyone’s saying we need a new adult category,


    INTERVIEWER

    New adult?


    BOVALINO

    New adult. So that’s between 18 to 25, probably.


    INTERVIEWER

    Hpw would a new adult category distinguish itself from a young adult book?


    BOVALINO

    I think this is something that goes back to a problem that’s occurring right now in publishing. And I’m going to answer this in a cyclical way, but basically if you look at the readership of YA, 50% of the readership, if not more, is adults. And to me, that means that these adults are sort of finding something within YA that they’re not finding in adult or in other places. And there’s been such a huge advancement in the last 10 years, especially with books that do fall into this sweet spot in, I was going to say mostly in fantasy, but also you have normal people and contemporary in real life as well. But as someone who is 24, I don’t feel like I have anything figured out. And I think that something in YA is that these people are just as confused and frustrated as I feel 80% of the time. And sometimes they’re 16 to 18, but they have this way of dealing with problems that I associate with as a 24-year-old girl. And I don’t see that as much in the adult market. And I’m just speaking about adult contemporary novels, because I’ve read a lot of fantasy that I feel I can see myself in. But just looking at contemporary novels, I find it very difficult to align with the issues that are being faced. And I think a book that actually did this really well was RED, WHITE & ROYAL BLUE by Casey McQuiston. It’s a very fluffy, a fluffy lovely book. And you see this a lot in romance actually, where we do have those narrators, but tends to be relegated to genre fiction that we’re seeing narrators of this age. And I just don’t feel like I’m seeing the struggles that I’m facing, especially when you’re looking at the people who are writing a lot of older literary fiction. I mean in my generation, I don’t know if I’m ever really going to buy a house and I’m doing school forever and ever, and ever, and I don’t see that as much [in adult fiction]. I think gemre fiction is also my happy place because it’s a lot easier to dissociate with the rest of the world.


    INTERVIEWER

    You have another book coming out next year from the same publisher, NOT GOOD FOR MAIDENS.


    BOVALINO

    It is. I haven’t never gotten to talk about this one. This is exciting.


    INTERVIEWER

    It’s described on as SALEM’S LOT meets THE DARKEST PART OF THE FOREST in a horror fantasy retelling of Christina Rossetti’s GOBLIN MARKET, which is a really heady mix.


    BOVALINO

    This one, actually, it’s funny. Because I have ideas that are very old and remain on the proverbial upper shelf of not written, but are just ideas. And then things that just come to me in like an immediate flash of, –Okay, this is a thing that’s going to happen. And not good for maidens. It’s one of those books that just came all at once. So the seedlings of it started when I was on a university trip to Highgate Cemetery, which is in London. So London has, I think, seven really fancy old cemeteries where they used to bury people and Highgate is this Gothic, overgrown masterpiece of just, I don’t know; it’s aesthetically perfect. But it took like obviously a hundred years to get that way.


    INTERVIEWER

    It’s a weird place, I was there a long time ago, and that’s a great way of putting it.


    BOVALINO

    It’s also just desolate and beautiful and still within the reach of the city. And it’s so interesting to see that mix come together. But, so Christina Rossetti is buried there, so it was just interesting. Reading GOBLIN MARKET when I was a kid in Pennsylvania, because I’d read it for high school, and I never imagine myself being anywhere other than Pennsylvania. And then suddenly I’m in England, like at Christina Rossetti’s grave. And I thought, –This is weird. So I re-read GOBLIN MARKET. And I thought, –I actually really like this. And then fast forward, about six months, when we sold my first book, I had a month before everything locked down, but we didn’t know that was happening. So in that month I took myself on a little mini trip to Yorkshire and I was in York and it’s a beautiful city. And it has this medieval city wall. The cathedral’s incredible. The architecture is amazing and there’s a section of the city, it’s called the Shambles, and it’s essentially a medieval market street. Everything leans in on itself. And just having that, the idea of Christina Rosetti’s GOBLIN MARKET, I knew I wanted to do a retelling; and then being in this medieval market street. But in the 21st century and feeling that mix come together, I thought, –This is the book that I’m writing next. And it came to be that we needed an option book. That was the right vibe. So we sold it on proposals. So three chapters and a synopsis, and then I wrote it from that.


    INTERVIEWER

    Is that the one you’re working on now?


    BOVALINO

    We’re doing edits now. Making it pretty. It’s a little shambolic at the moment.


    INTERVIEWER

    How does it feel to have two books lined up?


    BOVALINO

    Yeah. I mean, I wish I could say more confident. I also wish I could say my brain has wrapped itself around the idea that this is happening. I literally got my arcs last week and I finally got to hold it and look at the cover of devil and like see it as a physical object. And it still hasn’t really clicked in my brain that this is happening. I don’t know if it ever will. So, it is quite weird in that respect. And I feel like authors talk a lot about imposter syndrome and feeling like they don’t really deserve all these things that they’re getting or not really think mentally that, –O, I’m a person who’s getting published now. And it is a very weird disconnect between what my brain thinks my career is doing right now versus what my career is actually doing. And yeah, in a year and a half there will be two books on the shelf with my name on it. And that’s honestly like astronomical to me. Little Tori’s like, yay.


    INTERVIEWER

    We are going through this very weird couple of years. Has that also changed things a lot for you?


    BOVALINO

    Yeah. I think the isolation is really getting to me in a way that it’s done in the brain of a horror novelist. I think that it doesn’t feel real also, just because I haven’t been able to have the conventional process. And I think anyone who had books coming out in 2020 and 2021 feels the same way in that you don’t really get to celebrate the milestones in the same way. The first time I sold a book I went to the pub with friends and we had like a great evening. And now this time I was like, –O cool. We can get, pizza. We don’t really get to do much like in person, press. As well. So I won’t really have an in-person launch event that I know of. And I was dreaming of my launch event from being a 17-year-old. So that’s sad. But at the same time, I think that the way a lot of authors have done digital events has really opened up global interaction in a way that has been impossible before. And I’m really sad about BookCon not happening and conventions not happening, like YALC, a young adult, literary literary convention in London. I don’t think that’s going to happen either. But being in the UK has made me feel quite far from a lot of people, but then I’ve been able to go to like virtual book launches and participate that way. And that’s something that I haven’t been able to do in a couple of years. So it’s been really nice to connect that way. It’s nice to be able to reach out to someone and say –Hey, I read your book over lockdown. This really made me happy. It made my week. And that’s something I don’t think I would have done before. But I’ve really reevaluated my process and how other people play into it.


    INTERVIEWER

    I guess that’s the silver lining.


    BOVALINO

    I’m trying to be optimistic about it.


    INTERVIEWER

    Instagram is a more and more of a thing for some writers, particularly YA writers. And book blogging. And book blogging with photos. Is that something you’re gearing up for on Instagram?


    BOVALINO

    Yeah. So I actually separated out my Instagram from like my personal because I have my personal Instagram just aligned with book Instagram for years. And then I realized that I don’t want teenagers searching and finding things from when I was 17. I mean, all my high school friends are on there. I want to keep up with my college friends, but I don’t want readers seeing that. So I separated it out. I made a book Instagram a few months ago and it’s weird, being a person, but also in some cases, making yourself into a brand, if that makes sense. So with the book t’s really draining because I don’t want to share that much of my personal life on it. You know, you come to a point where you don’t want to. So I try to make it detached, but also interesting, but also up to date. And also I want to be interacting with writers that I also like. And it’s hard to maintain that.


    INTERVIEWER

    To keep your guard up.


    BOVALINO

    Yeah. And also when you don’t want to say anything at all, not in relation to social events or current events or anything like that. But so if something happens in my personal life, there’s a lot of times I just don’t want to talk about it online anymore. And that’s, I mean, growing up in the generation where we put everything on the internet, that’s something that I’ve sort of been coming to terms with, especially over the pandemic and that I don’t want my entire life to be online and discoverable. And honestly, some people are so naturally good at it. Like they’ve just curated it to a point where they just need to spend five minutes on it. But for me, it takes up so much of my time to specifically curate that. I feel like it is an excuse for me to not write. Okay. And through the brain fog of pandemic, my brain searching for all excuses to not write. So it starts to pile on.


    INTERVIEWER

    You mentioned in an email that you’ve been reading a lot of horror. What horror have you been enjoying recently?


    BOVALINO

    So, I have always been a voracious horror reader in that I was the kid that my parents have a lot of whispered discussions about whether I should really be reading that. But it’s my parents’ fault because they had all the Stephen King books in my house. And so lately I’ve been branching out, hopefully a lot. But I really liked recently MEXICAN GOTHIC by Silvia Moreno-Garcia and THE ONLY GOOD INDIANS by Stephen Graham Jones, which are two titles that are going around a lot. I’m reading Michelle Paver’s book about the Arctic and Antarctic. It’s like ghost stories that involve a lot of snow and ice. And I’m quite into that idea of isolation, especially with current events.


    INTERVIEWER

    The Paver is DARK MATTER?


    BOVALINO

    Yes. DARK MATTER. I read THIN AIR a few months ago.


    INTERVIEWER

    Okay. I haven’t read it, but I heard part of it serialised on Radio Four.


    BOVALINO

    I’m pretty sure that it was like the Radio Four special.


    INTERVIEWER

    Do you try to avoid certain things while you’re writing?


    BOVALINO

    So I don’t really because the way I think of my brain, or the way my brain functions, it’s like a reservoir. And so when I’m writing something, I’m gradually draining words out of the reservoir and then when I stop, I need to refill it. So when I’m writing something quickly, like I did with maidens, I would literally finish like a three chapter section, and then I’d read a book, and then I’d finish a three chapter section, and read a book, just because I felt like when I’m working under that pressure I need to constantly surround myself with words, with things other people are writing. Especially with that book, because the voice and the style were set already. So I wasn’t going to change the style or the voice or the content based on the things I was reading, but the atmosphere was really important to develop. So if I’m reading all these horror novels, it’s keeping me in this sort of like dark, horror-esque mindset. And that was really important for me, keeping in that vein over such a long, well, such a short drafting process, but like a long stretch of time. Because it was six weeks that I spent on it.


    INTERVIEWER

    That seems quite fast.


    BOVALINO

    I ended up doing two drafts, so I had about four months to do two versions of it. So I just feel like I need to keep refilling. And right now I’m one of those terrible people that just has half-read books scattered around the house. I need to just have like a weekend and finish everything.


    INTERVIEWER

    Do you find yourself watching television shows and films to refill the resevoir? Is there that type of cross fertilization??


    BOVALINO

    Yeah, there definitely is. I was such a horror movie wimp, honestly, until very recently. And then the atmosphere wasn’t happening soon enough, so I just started watching stuff. PENNY DREADFUL, I liked that, like the midline of Gothic with psychological horror. So PENNY DREADFUL is one of my favorite series. And I always mix up CRIMSON PEAK and TWIN PEAKS, but I think CRIMSON PEAK is the one I’m going for.


    INTERVIEWER

    That’s the one in the house.


    BOVALINO

    Yeah, exactly. So that, and then I’ll also watch jump scare horror every now and then. But I will be under the blanket for half the time.


    INTERVIEWER

    So you were reading King at a relatively young age, but with the movies you were still behind the sofa.


    BOVALINO

    I’m terrified.


    INTERVIEWER

    It’s a big year for books, particularly middle grade and young adult. What are you excited about reading?


    BOVALINO

    It is a great year for books. I’ve been lucky enough to read quite a few, but in terms of spooky and Gothic, DOWN COMES THE NIGHT by Alison Saft. That one is already out, it came out in early March. It is incredible, like spooky and atmospheric. And it does fantasy in a very close to earth way. But the fantasy or the magic system is based off of medicine. So it’s a very medically oriented fantasy and just the world building in it, I’m so jealous of Allison’s ability. It’s amazing. And then coming out in August, August 3rd, is THE DEAD AND THE DARK by Courtney Gould. And that is a ghost hunting, a queer contemporary novel. And it’s set in Oregon and again, highly atmospheric. But also really funny. There are literally parts that I just laughed out loud at, at like three o’clock in the morning and hoped I didn’t wake up the rest of the house. Anther one that I’m really looking forward to, another Gothic, is WITHIN THESE WICKED WALLS by Lauren Blackwood. That one’s a Jane Eyre retelling with Ethiopian-inspired fantasy. And then of course, Stephen Graham Jones has another one coming out this year, MY HEART IS A CHAINSAW.


    INTERVIEWER

    That’s a great title. [Stephen Graham Jones’s new book is MY HEART IS A CHAINSAW.]


    BOVALINO

    And Kendare Blake has one coming out called ALL THESE BODIES and it’s supposed to be aligned, not in the same universe, but in the same atmosphere as ANNA DRESSED IN BLOOD. So I’m so excited for that one. And then it’s not actually horror, but Tasha Suri has a new fantasy and it’s the first of a trilogy coming out. It’s called THE JASMINE THRONE and I will read anything that she writes.


    INTERVIEWER

    I think THE DEVIL MAKES THREE is going to speak to people of all sorts of different ages. Do you think it is going to do better as a young adult book or as something bridging between young adult and adult?


    BOVALINO

    You know, I think that’s, it really depends on how much people buy into me, flexing the boarding school setting a little bit more than possibly is good. So I just want to preface this by saying, when I first wrote the book, it was actually set in college in that Eliot was a grad student and then Tess was undergrad. And then when I wrote it down, because it was one of those things where I didn’t feel like the voice fit an adult novel. So when I wrote it down, I basically kept the characters. I investigated their relationships with their parents a little bit more, and then I kept all the profanity. But then, then I think it still has these emotions that are appealing to sort of a university or young adult young adult, as in, the adults who are young crowd. In that I think that a lot of the things they struggle with were things that I was struggling with at the time, specifically Tess being stressed about everything in her life and keeping afloat and Eliot grieving someone who is still alive. And that’s specifically about my relationship with my grandparents. And I think that those ideas will be appealing to a wider audience. But in terms of reception, I think the thing to sort of keep in mind is, –Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.


    INTERVIEWER

    This is a great way to live.


    BOVALINO

    Yeah. So, in my heart, when I was writing books, when I was a kid, I was always just thinking if it’s one person’s favorite book, then that’s an accomplishment. And I’m just trying to remember that if it’s even one person’s book. That they’re like, –Oh my God, this book gets me, then that’s what I set out to do. And if everyone else who read it, hates it, then okay. At least they bought it. That’s fine. I hope it just finds someone, one person.


    INTERVIEWER

    Can you give any sneak peaks into what we might see in the future from you?


    BOVALINO

    Actually, a reason I’m reading a lot of Michelle Paver and [LAUGHS] cold books, so I’m just shooting this into the universe. I really hope eventually it becomes a real book. I’ve just started writing it. I would really like to do a book about a B list, horror movie being shot in an abandoned ski lodge. And then the real horror comes in the ghosts of these people’s past, who are shooting it together. And that would fall heavily into the new adult section if it existed, but it doesn’t. So I have to figure out how to do that.


    INTERVIEWER

    It doesn’t yet. You can speak it into existence.


    BOVALINO

    Right. Fingers crossed for what, 2023?